Tagged: NTSB

NTSB file: N26617 Cessna 182, Louisburg-Hilton Head, three aboard

This happened March 1. An instrument-rated pilot took off in a Cessna 182 on a dark, stormy night, and crashed shortly after takeoff. He had two passengers with him.

Here’s a write-up, which says the plane was in the air for less than 20 seconds. I’m not sure that’s correct, given that the plane crashed about two miles away from the airport. It’s possible that the reporter was told that the TRACON controller only had radar contact for 20 seconds.

According to the same article, one of the passengers was making her first plane trip.

NTSB files: Icon A5

Retired baseball pitcher Roy Halladay died yesterday in his brand-new Icon A5. The Icon A5 is a light sport plane, although Halladay apparently was a full private pilot. He received his training and license in 2014, after he retired from baseball.

The A5 has a number of safety-minded features, including an angle-of-attack indicator, a Ballistic Recovery Systems parachute, and control elements apparently designed to create benign stalling characteristics. When the model was first introduced, there were other, more controversial features, including mandatory cockpit audio and video recording. After consumer outcry, those requirements were dropped. One requirement not dropped was an agreement to hold the manufacturer blameless in the event of an accident (i.e., no lawsuits).

The Icon was being marketed to the non-aviation community as an airborne version of motorized vehicles just as jet skis, ATVs, and motorcycles. In other words, as just another toy for thrill seekers.

As for the accident, of which there are few details, all the warning signs are present: rich guy with a competitive personality, newly certificated, with a fancy new airplane. It remains to be seen how the pilot came to crash a plane designed to be flown low and slow, with ample safety margins.

But then, what is slow for a normal airplane is very fast when you’re flying a “jet ski with wings,” just over the water.

NTSB Files: Eurocopter EC145 in Eastern North Carolina

Terrible aviation accident close to home. One of the two Life Flight helicopters operated by Duke University Health Systems crashed this morning in a remote part of eastern North Carolina. Mild temperatures, skies clear and a million. What happened to this Eurocopter EC145? Fuel exhaustion?

Each helicopter – both Eurocopter EC145s – can travel at about 150 mph and cover all of North Carolina and parts of South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. A typical flight includes two critical care providers, a pilot and a single patient. Team members work rotating 12-hour shifts.

Avery confirmed that the one that crashed bore the tail number N146DU. An FAA database indicates the twin-engined craft was manufactured in 2011.

http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local/counties/durham-county/article172023472.html

UPDATE: Sept. 23, 2017

The NTSB preliminary report came out a few days ago. The chopper had plenty of fuel-it looks like there was an engine problem. Several witnesses reported seeing smoke trailing behind the airship, and the inspectors made the following notes about the engine:

The outboard 4 ft of No. 1 (yellow) blade came to rest in the 8 ft tall grass
adjacent to the drainage path. The grass on either side of the blade was undisturbed. The tail rotor shaft remained attached to the transmission. The transmission could not be rotated by hand.
No foreign object damage was found on the axial compressor blades of either engine. No damage was observed on the visible portions of the turbine blades at the rear of either engine. The gas generator of the No. 1 engine moved freely when rotated by hand, the No. 2 engine gas
generator would not rotate. The No. 1 engine fuel shutoff valve was found in the open position. The No. 2 engine fuel shutoff valve was damaged and its position could not be determined during the field examination. The No. 2 engine rear turbine shaft bearing exhibited discoloration consistent with overheating and lack of lubrication. The bearing roller pins were worn down to the surface of the bearing race. The end of the turbine shaft aft of the nut exhibited rotational nonuniform damage.